Article

March 12, 2017

Living as the Inner Knower in the Midst of the Collective Me

Those rare souls who are connected to the inner knower are destined to be alone in society. Society is ruled by the collective me, which is a phantom self with no real individuality that has accepted the state of forgetfulness as its true identity and only reality. When we speak of society here, we also refer to its so-called spiritual aspects, including religions and spiritual traditions, such as Buddhism and Advaita. Those who adhere to these traditions also live as non-individuals in the condition of forgetfulness.

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Article

March 2, 2017

The Knower: Journey into the Center of Our Existence

Over the last several months, we have gained an increasingly higher and more refined spiritual understanding of essential me. Now, we have arrived at a critical point of entering the most mysterious domain of the true center of our existence – the knower. ‘The knower’ is a more accurate name for what we have previously called ‘the observer’. To enter the domain of the knower is to finally become conscious of that which actually makes consciousness conscious. The knower is the most hidden and yet the most obvious aspect of our consciousness. He is the unseen seer who is concealed not only from the world of appearances but also from the world of pure subjectivity, and he who looks out to and knows both of these worlds. We are truly blessed to know the knower at last. The knower is the center of intelligence of the soul who illuminates her multidimensional self with recognition. He is the first and foremost conscious manifestation of immanent I am, and as such, he can be regarded as the deepest dimension of who we are as individual beings. And yet to know the knower is the most challenging task for any seeker on the path. Paradoxically, the knower is the the most unknown. He is the blind spot in our consciousness that all spiritual traditions have failed to recognize. And if one fails to recognize the knower, what is ‘consciousness’ or the ‘realization of self’? One is recognizing what the knower recognizes through his expansion via pure attention into transcendent I am. But one is not recognizing the recognizer himself. Why did Buddha speak of no-self? The simple answer is because he did not know the knower. The truth is that no matter how profound our spiritual accomplishment may be, when we do not know the knower, we remain fundamentally asleep and unconscious.   Part One: The Two Faces of the Knower   Knower: The Two Faces of Janus The Roman demigod Janus, represented as a head with two faces, one looking in and one looking out, can be used as a metaphor for the knower. For the Romans, Janus was the god of beginnings, the guardian of passages and gates, and the protector of the state in times of war. He looked into the past and into the future, which was symbolized by his two faces. Similarly, the knower looks in two directions: his outer face looks into the external reality via external attention, while his inner face looks at the inner world of pure subjectivity via pure attention. The outer face is what we call the ‘outer knower’, and the inner face the ‘inner knower’. There are not actually two knowers, but one knower with two very distinct facets. The inner knower is the primary identity of the knower, while the outer knower can be regarded as his secondary center. The inner knower can be present even before it has an awakened center of identity as a result of pure attention being activated. However, the inner knower establishes his identity only through activating his bare attention and embodying essence-me. The outer knower can also be present before it is awakened, but only in an unconscious way as the observer. For the outer knower to awaken, he must establish his own center...

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Article

February 21, 2017

Spiritual Suffering and its Loving Guidance

I saw grief drinking a cup of sorrow and called out, it tastes sweet, does it not? You have caught me, grief answered, and you have ruined my business, How can I sell sorrow, when you know it’s a blessing? Rumi Suffering is an inseparable part of human existence and it serves as the main motivation to enter the spiritual path. Sometimes we speak of spiritual longing as a different and more exalted emotion than suffering, but longing can also be considered a form of suffering, a deep yearning that we feel inside for something missing; what was called ‘sweet misery’ by Rumi. Some of the main traditions of enlightenment have the transcendence of suffering through attaining Moksha or Nirvana as their main spiritual goal. They see self-realization as a release from the pain of human existence. However, suffering is much more complex than just being something to be eliminated, and not all suffering is the same. Even an enlightened being continues to experience physical and psychological suffering. Suffering is an essential part of the polarities of this physical dimension. Without a minus there is no plus, and our reality is based on complementary opposites which attract and repulse each other. Purpose of Spiritual Suffering The purpose of spiritual awakening is not to eliminate all suffering, but to transcend spiritual suffering, which is the type of suffering caused by being separated from our pure nature. Spiritual suffering is the most profound suffering there is, but only those who are more spiritually evolved are able to recognize it for what it is. People who are not spiritually conscious will not be aware of this suffering. In this sense, the spiritual path is designed with something of an inbuilt alarm for those who are sensitive to their disconnection from their spiritual source, signaling to them that they are at last ready to regain their true nature. Buddha’s description in his Four Noble Truths of the causes of suffering (old age, sickness and death) did not include the spiritual one, indicating that this was intended for a more general, less evolved, audience. Many seekers have the goal of ending suffering, but usually more in the context that Buddha spoke of, rather than from any real idea or experience of what spiritual suffering is. We will not have truly entered the path until we have a higher perspective on suffering, which comes from being in touch with the deep pain of separation from our pure nature. Part of the path itself is becoming spiritually conscious enough to be aware of our incompleteness because of this separation, and this is felt in the suffering and yearning which are the signposts pointing and motivating us. Since awakening is not a single state, a question may arise as to which type of awakening allows one to reach emancipation from suffering? It is an important question that has not yet been properly addressed by past traditions. To answer it, we must transform our perception of the path from seeing it solely as a means of transcending suffering to include the evolution of suffering as an integral part of the journey. The correct definition of spiritual suffering is suffering that is felt because of being incomplete. As long as we are incomplete we will suffer. This is a...

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Audio

February 18, 2017

Mastering the Art of Self-Absorption - Retreat 1/2017

Revelation

January 1, 2017

The Great Return of Essence-Me to Immanent I am

Our most recent retreat in India was unquestionably the most important one to date. The teaching is evolving exponentially with astonishing intelligence and precision. Revelations are unfolding with ever-increasing clarity, and this greatly aides the ease with which we can comprehend the subtleties of the inner dimension.

Even though the teaching may seem to have become more complicated and challenging to grasp, once absorbed, this seeming complexity will actually add a higher level of clarity to the process of evolving into essential me. Simplicity is desirable, but not merely for its own sake. It is desirable only when it also honestly reflects reality. Simplicity which obscures proper understanding defeats its own purpose, so we work towards conceptualizing the path in a way where complexity and clarity are in balance. As Einstein said, “Things should be made as simple as possible, but not more

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Article

November 7, 2016

Revelatory Excerpts from the Upanishads

The Upanishads are the first known written record of an inner path to enlightenment and, as such, are the original revelation of the knowledge of self. Despite this, they do not represent a unified teaching, but offer bits and pieces of insights spread throughout its various texts.

The general consensus is that two of the earliest Upanishads are Chandogya and Brihadaranyaka, and one would therefore assume that these two are ‘root’ Upanishads, and that those which were written later would be elaborations and further developments based on the original revelations.

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Article

November 7, 2016

Upanishads: An Incomplete Revelation

The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad says: “Invisible, He sees; inaudible, He hears; unthinkable, He thinks; unknowable, He knows. None other can see, hear, think, know. He is your own Self, the immortal; the controller; nothing else matters.”

The teacher refers here to our fundamental sense of self that is hidden beyond our psychosomatic existence. He is not speaking about great enlightenment, nirvana, becoming one with the cosmos, or anything equally exciting – he is pointing to something simple, so simple that it is too simple for most people to even care about. He is pointing to our fundamental subjectivity before it has become entangled in the world of appearances and forgotten itself.

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Article

November 5, 2016

The Revelation of Enlightenment in Ancient India

Something happened in India in the period between 800 to 500 BCE – something mysterious. Unexpectedly, as if from nowhere, the sages of the Upanishads revealed the knowledge of pure subjectivity, the knowledge of self, to humanity. For the first time in the history of human evolution, the possibility that a mysterious reality, independent of objects and our psychological identity, existed and could be directly known arose into the collective consciousness. It was at this time that a few more spiritually conscious human beings began to question the objectification of the divine as so-called ‘gods’ that ruled our fate from a place outside of who we are. And what they discovered was that the divine does not exist externally to our very own deeper consciousness and intelligence.

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Revelation

October 24, 2016

Further Revelations on Essential Me

We recently created a higher resolution map of essential me, where what we used to call ‘conscious me’ was divided into two separate identities: conscious me and pure conscious me. This division is not arbitrary or superfluous: it is a more accurate reflection of the dimension of consciousness.

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Article

October 16, 2016

Flexible Destiny: Creating our Future

We can make an important distinction between destiny and fate. The concept of fate comes from a one-dimensional, mechanistic perception of reality in which consciousness and intelligence are not seen as creative and dynamic processes. Most people essentially live mechanically and have no control over their lives, so the idea of fate becomes an appealing projection of their own powerlessness. And even many traditional spiritual teachings have embraced fate within their simplistic vision of ‘one-reality rules all’, together with a kind of passive surrender into the universal self and relinquishing of individual will.

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Revelation

October 3, 2016

Clarifying the New Map of Essential Me

To have the correct realization does not mean that one has grasped it conceptually. In addition, truth can be presented in very low or very high resolution. For instance, when non-dual teachings speak of consciousness as one state beyond and without me, they reflect some level of truth, but the resolution of their understanding is so low that the picture is highly distorted, to the point of being false. If you were to look from outer space at our planet, you would see a round shape suspended between other celestial bodies. It is indeed the earth, but the earth is much more than round object. And to know this, we must come closer to it. The closer we come, the more we understand it.

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